Worship
 

"Worship is fundamentally about God, then about our relationship with God, and then about us."

 

 

 

 

                    

 

 

"People need an opportunity to offer thanksgiving, praise, and adoration and that is the main purpose of worship."

                    

 

 

 

 

 

"Worship has a purpose and direction and doesn't just happen because 'that's what churches do on Sunday'"



 
"Worship is not a means to an end (as a tool for evangelism, or missions, or education, or stewardship, or fund raising, or making announcements, etc.), but an end in itself — an integrated experience of the community of faith with and for God."

Every week, we want worshipers to experience four things —

• we want them to have an opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to God,

• we want them to better understand God’s will for the lives of God’s people,

• we want to challenge them to make a commitment to God,

• we want to give them a chance to make that commitment.


Worship is about God. 

We don’t use worship to attract new believers; we create meaningful experiences for those who already believe — to honor and praise God.  We build faith through relationships in non-worship settings, then provide times for those who are growing in their faith to worship in meaningful ways.

Our focus is on the Lord.  We gather to worship the Lord.  It’s not for education and it’s not about missions and programs, and it isn’t social time.  We focus on God.  We can do the other stuff in other settings, but worship time is the Lord’s time.

What makes the sanctuary a ‘holy space?’  We want the people who come into our church to experience the presence of the risen Christ and the power of the living God.  If people don’t experience God, then we’re probably getting in the way.  We try to remove anything and everything that takes anything away from a focus on God.

Everything we do, we do with the hope that it will help people pay attention to God.  Our songs and choir help people sing praises to God.  Our scripture reading is done reflectively and contemplatively, to allow people to think about God.  Our prayer times are open to everyone, and we never hurry them.  Our sermons illuminate the scriptures — they are very interesting and sometimes entertaining, but we never allow the information and delivery to replace the real meaning. 

We want people to come here to be with God.